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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,154 (some duplicates have been removed)
and u.s. technology giants have been fighting each other in the courts over technology for smartphones and other mobile devices. the people at samsung say they added iphone 5, apple's iphone 5 to a patent infringement lawsuit. samsung alleges the latest smartphone violates eight of its patents. the claim targets technologies for displays data and storing photos. lawyers for samsung say they will exclude patents on the high speed wireless communications protocol known as lte. samsung has an edge in this technology. samsung received a green light from a u.s. district court in california in another case. the company can resume sales of its tablet device the galaxy 10.1 in the u.s. market. the court decided in june to temporarily ban sales. it lifted the injunction after a separate lawsuit in august found this particular tablet did not infringe on apple patents. >>> in other news ahmadinejad blamed the enemies of iran for the fall of its currency. u.s. and european leaders imposed sanctions in july to encourage them to abandon the nuclear missions. >> translator: sanctions are used as a ps
conflict. still they are finding new and effective ways to strike. the three u.s. military police officers were on foot patrol in a market with afghan police when the suicide bomber struck. four afghan officers, and six civilians were also killed, and dozens hurt. joint u.s./afghan operations are becoming more common, and so are the risks. on saturday an american soldier and a u.s. civilian contractor were killed by an afghan soldier. the latest in a growing series of insider attacks. despite mounting worries, afghan commandos firing live rounds still train side by side with elite american special forces. >> right here in front of you. >> reporter: you can't stop working with these guys? >> absolutely not. >> reporter: at this level, joint combat operations are now the rule. americans no longer go it alone. >> i'm very impressed with your training here today. >> reporter: general tony thomas heads all special operations forces in afghanistan. his men rely on their afghan partners. a relationship the taliban hopes to undermine. >> we lost another soldier to a green-on-blue attack. what are
building up their forces and deploying tanks along the border. u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton has condemned syria for the shelling of the turkish town. >> we are outraged that the syrians have been shooting across the border. >> clinton said the u.s. government is consulting with turkey over what she called a very dangerous situation. turkey is a nato ally of the u.s. she called on responsible nations worldwide to push the syrian government into a cease-fire and political transition of power. >>> emergency workers in syria are doing what they can to hp the wound aftern attack in the city of aleppo. at least three powerful explosions ripped through the center of the commercial capital. they killed more than 30 people. state run tv reports explosions occurred near an officer's club in the northern city. opposition forces are claiming responsibility. they say they used the car bombings to target officers and militias loyal to president bashar al assad. the free syrian army renewed its offensive last week in an effort to win control of aleppo. government forces responded with air stri
with another from canada, creating a potentially devastating hybrid that could ravage parts of the u.s. northeast early next week. president obama took a break from campaigning thursday to cast an early ballot in his hometown of chicago. speaking at the polling center, obama encouraged americans to take advantage of early voting. >> for all of you who have not yet voted early, i just want everybody to see what an incredibly efficient process this was, thanks to the outstanding folks who are at this particular polling place. obviously, folks in illinois and take advantage of this. but all across the country, we are seeing a lot of early voting. it means you do not have to figure out whether you need to taint time off work, figure out how to pick up the kids, and still cast your ballot if something happens on election day, you'll have already taken care of it. and as bad weather, w you will weather,et. or in chicago, snowy. this was really convenient. >> campaigning in ohio, mitt romney predicted to supporters his election would mean an increase in workers' take-home pay. >> the presiden
they're both potentially vulnerable. also, shocking video shows workers for a u.s. security contractor in afghanistan allegedly partying up, seemingly so drunk and drugged they could hardly speak. >>> plus, a reason to take the window seat. we have the amazing story of how airline passengers spotted and help save a man who had been stranded at sea for nine days. we want to welcome our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm wolf blitzer and you're in "the situation room." >>> monday's third and final presidential debate will be a serious challenge for both candidates. it's focused on international policy and arena where both mitt romney lacks experience and the obama administration is under growing criticism, especially when it comes to the situation in the middle east. let's start with cnn's white house correspondent dan loathian. i assume officials in the white house campaign they know the president has questions he's going to answer. >> reporter: that's correct, wolf. and there doesn't appear to be much of a difference between the two candidates when it comes to forei
dollars to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp out color. -- we can stamp out hunger. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: phyllis bennis is the new director for the international ism project. she joined us tonight from new york. it is good to have you back on this program. >> great to be with you, tavis. poopsie but in and ryan went -- tavis: biden and ryan went after it tonight. it was interesting for a lot of people to watch. but we get back to it really matters, the two guys at the top of the ticket, president obama and governor romney. given that governor romney came back out with his own policy speech, that policy will get on to the agenda in the next two debates in the last debate is exclusively about foreign policy. we know we are headed in that direction but the speech that mr. ravi gave earlier this week, he essentially suggested that president obama had been weak on foreign policy. he went on to deconstructs that and explain it in a variety of ways. but yourhoughts on mr. romney's approach to put foreig
on the u.s. presidential debates. then to leaders of the chilean student movement, which is the largest protests since the days of augusto pinochet a generation ago. >> we saw several riots, the biggest one of the mall last year published of them all last year, over a million people in the streets. within six months of student strikes. many students in high school lost their academic year. >> i think our biggest challenge is we don't only need the democratization education, but the democratization of the entire country. >> all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. president obama and republican challenger mitt romney are heading to long island today for their second presidential debate. tonight's debate is at hofstra university, just three weeks before the general election including both foreign and domesticy issues in a town hall setting the kids undecided voters in the audience the opportunity to question the candidates. the final debate will be next monday in florida and will focus on foreign policy issues.
there is a boom in u.s. oil production right now but you won't see a drop of relief at the pump. we'll tell you why the production spike is falling short. >>> fearless felix redefines awesomeness. his super sonic base jump just doesn't break records, it sent sponsor's red bull's brand into the stats to fear. this could be one of the great marketing coupes of all time. even when they say it's not, it is always about money. melissa: first let's take a look at the day's market headlines the bulls charging ahead to start off the week. improving retail sales in september and better-than-expected earnings from citigroup helped boost stocks. the dow closed up 95 points. not bad. meanwhile the nasdaq posted its first gain in seven sessions. shares of eli lilly lept more than 4%. the drugmaker says the late-stage study of its new stomach cancer drug improved patients chances of survival. >>> investors are punishing shares of bankrate after-hours the financial services company slashed its third quarter and full-year earnings outlook. >>> to our top story tonight according to new reports iran is planning
violence, what are you concerned about? >> first, the u.s. death toll an event -- afghanistan tops 2000. we talk about america's longest- running war. all that and more coming up. this is democracy now!, democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. iran's currency has hit an all- time low amidst a worsening financial crisis brought upon by u.s.-led sanctions. on monday, the iranian rial dropped 15% to its lowest point against the dollar, capping a three-month contest that has seen its overall value drop 57%. the price of basic foods are on the rise since a new round of sanctions took place in july. a former u.s. ambassador to the un and under secretary of state thomas pickering criticized the act. it is not legal for them to pay for it. speaking to the council of foreign relations in new york, alioth parcel la hay says it has not backed away from its mountain of nuclear weapons. >> any country, including iran, uses meweapons of mass destruction, that is the end of the eligibility, legality, what ever you name it, of that government. weapons of mass destruction, as we said, i
and the continental corporation of the u.s. was the last resource rich part of the ten per zone the european enlightenment with inland waterways flowing in a convenient east west fashion than the west the caressed combined and our ideas and dhaka sees but because of where we happen to live as well that's why these things matter. why these things matter. they've allowed india and china to develop into the completely distinct great worlds of civilization we have much to do with each other through long periods of history. >> let's take that image that you've offered of america, this place with all these great natural harbors and rivers that run the right way but that was true for thousands of years and didn't leave it to the development of what we think of as the united states. it wasn't until the european civilization a rise and began to make use of those harbors and rivers they were obvious so help us think about why it's the geography we spoke upon based to the cultural with the supposition one aspect. >> phyllis do ha and -- that was unable to cross across a land of the voyages of the devel
in the u.s. intelligence community and had many high ranking positions in it, including executive director, director for the cia, and his final position was national intelligence officer for the near east and south asia where he provided analytical support. and he was a visiting fellow at brookings in the year 2000, and as a reserve officer in the u.s. army, and has also been publishing externally important literature the last few years since retiring from the government. so i will step out of the way now. .. >> what are the prospects for a new president achievement anding a peace setment between israelis and palestinians? i believe, unfortunately, that they are not very good. by a fair settlement i mean a two-state solution, a palestinian state on comprising gaza and the west bank with some modern negotiated land swaps with control of its border, its borders, its water resources, its air space. something similar to the clinton parameters of 2000. i believe that this outcome more than any alternative would satisfy the core needs for security and self-determination of both israelis and pale
mode instructions. obama some times had trouble getting a word in. many u.s. media analysts say romney had a belttter performan. the candidates have two more debates they have five weeks to win over undecided voters. turkish forces have fired artillery shells across the border into syria. they're retaliating for syrian mortars that landed in southern turkey. it killed five people including a woman and her three children. the mortar landed in the turkish town of akcakale. they have warned of prompt action if their security was threatened again. turkey has provided support for the opposition free syrian army and the turkish military has been building up tanks. turkey has provided support for the opposition for syrian army and turkish military commanders have been building up their forces and deploying tanks along the border. >>> u.s. secretary of hillary clinton has condemned syria for its part in the exchange of fire. >> we are outraged that the syrians have been shooting across the border. >> clinton says u.s. government officials are consulting with their allies in turkey over what sh
weakness from asia and to a lesser extent, weakness in the u.s. as well. asia slowdown really hittin>> i cart and horse on that. the euro is falling to a session low, post those two bits of data. bund futures extending their gains as well. may not do anything for stock sentiment. talking about asia, china's manufacturing activity was up at a three-month high. the early read suggests the recovery. that wasn't enough to stop a 12th consecutive month of pmi contraction. some analysts still see the need for further stimulus. what is this telling us? are we now on the bottom of the downturn? not the downturn, the slowdown? >> possibly. it's too early to tell. it's only just in -- >> suggest there the chinese survey, the official government one might come out above 50. >> it may well do. but i think one of the interesting things was that the rate of decline has eased quite significantly. the smallest fall for five months. but in there, when we were reading through the reasons, they were saying that their trade had been disrupted due to the spat between japan and china. if we perhaps make a men
at 8 on c-span. later, the candidates hoping to represent arizona's 9th district in the u.s. house, democrat kirsten and steven later here on c-span2. >> what is the dinner, and how did it come about? >> so the al smith dinner is the most famous that presidential candidates show up every four years, and they show up, democrats and republicans -- i mean, it's really a memorial dinner for smith, and i think it's the thing that if anyone heard al smith's name at this point in time, that that's where you heard about al smith unless you hang around these hallowed halls. it's his lasting legacy, the place where the name gets out. it's held every year, not just every four years. prominent figures come in, it's a memorial dinner, a catholic charity dinner. people get together to assess the legacy of al smith and presidential candidates always especially to crack jokes about each other. >> in fact, they show up together most times, show up both the democrat and republican nominees show up together. we want to show you some of the past al smith's dinners. >> might i ask if senior clark comes
of the presidential debate. the issue of yesterday's jobs report is already being eyed as the big topic. u.s. unemployment falling to 7.8% in september. that is the first time that it's been below 8% in nearly four years. so what is the political impact of all of this with exactly one month until election day. shane is editor of xiansz and elections magazine and joins us with more insight. before we talk about specific numbers in the report. tell me overall what are the positives and negatives that each campaign can take from the latest jobs report? >> for president obama there is certainly a couple short term positives. the fact that the unemployment rate is now below that 8% mark, that is sort of psychological indicator there that i think no doubt helps the argument that he has been trying to make on the campaign trail. this is not the recovery we all wanted but we're on the road. for mitt romney it does take away one of talking points he has been very big on, number of consecutive months that the number has been at 8% or above, that line is gone from his speech. short term positives are t
to the former u.s. ambassador to pakistan. thank you for joining us. he was saying in his report this could prove a turning point with pakistan. what do you think? >> i think there are millions of people across pakistan that certainly hope so. i was very encouraged to die. of course, it is the day of prayer for malala. the chief of the mosque in lahore calls for "and ambassador of hope." that is an enormously significant. religious scholars have issued a fatwah, determining that the attack was unislamic. these are important messages that we hope will unify pakistan and they seem to be. >> how much support do you think there is at the grass-roots level for the taliban policy of not letting girls of education? >> is basically a conservative society. you would find most people are conservative about girls' education. they supported for the first -- for the first few years. they do support -- is long does it support girls' education. -- islam does support girls' education. the fact that malala is one of them, it has personalized the issue. >> do you think this attack on malala might help the pa
. >>> and dire warning about the u.s. power grid. it could shut down banking and even the flow of water. now there is a new warning about the chance of a massive attack in cyberspace. >>> and behind the scenes, a little known chapter of the american crisis, now shown on the screen and tonight, ben affleck, on why he was drawn to this story. >>> and from the heart, a mother's promise that got millions of moms talking about how to stay in the picture for their kids. >>> good evening, the vice president debate is now history, and while all eyes are on next tuesday's presidential debate and the town hall format, we have learned the eyes of over 50 million americans were on last night's event, a crisply moderated event, rowdy at times, tense at times, between the two men who represented the largest age gap of any debate. paul ryan and joe biden were not at the top of the ticket, but the reviews were instant in both style and substance, we begin with ron mott traveling with the campaign in ohio, good evening, ron. >> reporter: brian, good evening to you, as you can see behind me, governor mitt rom
. after the u.s.-led invasion of iraq, which was serious and opposed in syria was turning a blind life is not helping jihad discussed the area into iraq to kill u.s. soldiers and allied soldiers. there's a reason why they did that. they wanted the bush doctrine to say they were next on the hit list, so they were doing everything they could to help make this happen. there's one high-level syrian official told me later on, of course we were helping them across. you know what? we wanted you guys to kill them. that's why we wanted to go because we wanted these guys to kill you guys. we don't want them in our country. unfortunately they killed a lot of our boys. when he survived and particularly after the assassination of former lebanese rafik hariri, that was blamed on syria by most of the international community and the pressure just escalated exponentially after that against syria and people in late 2005 were counting the days for the assad regime. the expatriates, organization just waiting to move in one assad fell. but that created in hand and triumphalism and survivalism that very muc
as 2006, and the reason is this. in -- after the u.s. invasion of iraq which syria posed, and syria was turning a blind eye cannot help but the hottest, there is a reason why they did that. they wanted the bush doctrine to say that that there are next on the hit list so there would do anything they could to help make this happen. one high-level official told me the wrong, of course were helping. you know why? we wanted you guys to kill them. we don't want them in our country. when you survive that, particularly after the assassination, that was blamed on syria but most of the national community. the pressure just escalated exponentially after that. people work in late 2005 counting the days for the gasol regime. syrian expatriates, organizations that were just waiting to move in. but he survived that. in that thing that really created in him a sense of triumph and some and survivalism that very much informed his view of the world and response to the uprising in march 2011 because it instill then him the sense of destiny, righteousness, that he survived the best shot the west could t
spreads across the u.s. with new cases and new concerns tonight in "outfront" look at how this got passed medical safety measures. stay with us. so, what do you think? [ engine revs ] i'll take it. [ male announcer ] it's chevy truck month. now during chevy truck month, get 0% apr financing for 60 months or trade up to get the 2012 chevy silverado all-star edition with a total value of $8,000. hurry in before they're all gone! the wheels of progress. seems they haven't been moving much lately. but things are starting to turn around because of business people like you. and regions is here to help. with the experience and service to keep things rolling. from business loans to cash management, we want to be your partner moving forward. so switch to regions. and let's get going. together. but proven technologies allow natural gas producers to supply affordable, cleaner energy, while protecting our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ...
necessarily lead to an increase in the importance of emissions of the navy and air force. the success of the u.s. and persian gulf war, the first persian gulf war the experience shock at the synergistic way in which the u.s.-led coalition spectacularly applied technology to the modern warfare. the fourth key driver has been the incredible development of the chinese economy that has allowed for and paid for the more than sevenfold increase in the chinese defense spending over the two decades. so, the pla today is a force that continues to emphasize its traditions, but also it has new ones. as we know, president hu jintao has talked about the historic missions which both reiterate the old and talk about the role of the global setting. the only part of which applies to the land forces as they've been increasingly participants in the u.n. peacekeeping operations. there's been some important developments in technology for the ground forces, particularly the two most important are the and provide in the tactical ability of the pla land force which is to say we now think there are less than five divisi
frequently find numerous media outlets and has written for quite a few of the major u.s. newspapers in the area or in these areas of his expertise. he is extremely knowledgeable man as seen things happen and comments on them in my humble opinion in a reasonable and accurate way. he will be followed by doc or robert freedman who is the meyer hall pearl pearl storm professor of political science at baltimore hebrew university and a visiting professor of political science at johns hopkins university. he has been a consultant to the u.s. department of state and central intelligence agency and he is the author of four books, soviet foreign-policy and also the editor and has been the editor of 14 books on israel and middle eastern policy. and then our third speaker will be dr. stephen blank the strategic study institutes expert on soviet lock and post-soviet world since 1989. he is the editor of imperial decline in russia's changing position in asia and coeditor of the soviet military in the future, and the last speaker is dr. ariel cohen my colleague at heritage who is the senior fellow
headlines. the september u.s. jobs report is up on the mood of investors with data expected to show another month of modest yet unspectacular growth. samsung expects another record quarter of smartphone sales, but analysts say this could be the peak. and the bank of japan holds off on more easing for now, but opening the door to more action later this month. also, spain's finance minister says the country does not need a bailout facing a skeptical crowd in london, but could rajoy be cornered by the leaders of france and italy at a meeting today? i've been away for a couple of days and thanks for whoever filled in. on today's show, planning more sanctions on iran. we'll look at the worsening impact on the panel of experts. larry fink said the u.s. housing market is inching closer to a rebound. we'll hear more from that interview. and can the united states dodge a financial cliff in we'll speak to a guest who has clear ideas of what needs to be done. first it's about the jobs report, unemployment report due out at 8:30 eastern. economists think yet another month of modest job growth, but not
in launching a satellite carrying rocket. trying to test ballistic missile technology. pak accused the u.s. of forcing the council of the launch. and he accused south korean president of causing interkorean relations to hit rock bottom. some people from japan are an emotional and spiritual journey in north korea. paying their respects to relatives they lost at the end of world war ii. fathers and mothers, brothers and sisters, who died and were buried far from home. nhk world reports from pyongyang. >> reporter: parents or siblings of the group's members died of illness or hunger while interned by the soviet military. it occupied what is now north korea right after the war. the group arrived in pyongyang on saturday. they visited a site where the dead were first buried, then a hill where the gd more than 20 japanese journalists to cover the visit. some japanese are praying for the family members and relatives at their grave site. this is the first visit of its kind since world war ii. japan's health ministry says some 35,000 japanese died in the area. but it says the remains of about 20,00
of the recent attack there which rutted in the u.s. ambassador's death proves it's time for a change. >> the last couple of weeks with all the problems in libya and the administration's four or five different conflicting statement abouts it may be mitt romney goes in with the upper hand. >> reporter: look for candidates to bring discussions back to the economy as their running natures are doing. >> we're not even creating enough jobs every month just to keep up with the growth of our country's population. we are heading in the wrong direction. he can't run on that record. >> america is not in decline. here's what it is. romney and ryan are in den kneel. >> reporter: -- in denial. >> reporter: vice president biden spoke in ohio where a new poll shows president obama leading. his lead is half of what it was before the first two debates putting more pressure on both candidates to make this final debate count. >> joining me now from boca raton, florida with a preview of tonight's debate is washington bureau chief for u.s. d.a. susan -- "u.s.a. today" susan page. how have things changed f
people to unite. the economic penalties by the eu and the u.s. have caused the value of the currency, the riyal, to plummet. thousands of people took to the streets of tehran two weeks ago in protest. a spokesperson from iran's petroleum ministry said earlier this month a natural gas embargo would have no effect as the country doesn't export it to the eu. iran has the second largest natural gas reserves in the world. officials say they plan to expand exports to turkey and other neighboring countries. but these latest sanctions could affect those plans. >>> eu foreign ministers agreed to tighten sanctions against syria, too. they've been trying to pressure president bashar al assad to stop a crackdown on his own people. the ministers shared their concerns about the spread of the conflict into turkey and other neighboring countries. they agreed to impose sanctions on more individuals and companies. >> we've added 28 people to the list of those subject to a travel ban and an asset freeze. two additional entities were targeted with an asset freeze. >> 54 entities and 181 people are now s
? and the outbreak of meningitis spreads across the u.s. with new cases and new concerns tonight in "outfront" look at how this got passed medical safety measures. stay with us. [ snoring ] [ male announcer ] introducing zzzquil sleep-aid. [ snoring ] [ snoring ] [ male announcer ] it's not for colds, it's not for pain, it's just for sleep. [ snoring ] [ male announcer ] because sleep is a beautiful thing. [ birds chirping ] introducing zzzquil, the non-habit forming sleep-aid from the makers of nyquil. ♪ on gasoline. i am probably going to the gas station about once a month. last time i was at a gas station was about...i would say... two months ago. i very rarely put gas in my chevy volt. i go to the gas station such a smallmoun that i forget how to put gas in my car. [ male ancer ] and it's not just these owners giving the volt high praise. volt received the j.d. power and associates appeal award two years in a row. ♪ it's called passion. and it's not letting up anytime soon. at unitedhealthcare insurance company, we understand that commitment. so does aarp, serving americans 50 and over for
between the u.s., russia and syria. a pal discuss the syrian support of the -- a panel discusses russian support of the syrian civil war. this is about an hour and a half. >> we welcome all of you joining us on heritage foundation and on c-span. we ask that you turn off yourself funds as we begin recording for the benefit of today's program. the we will post for everyone's future reference. hosting our discussion today is dr. steven bucci. his focus is special operations and cyber security. he commanded the third battalion fifth special forces and also became the military assistant to donald rumsfeld. at his retirement, -- prior to joining us, he was a leading consultant on cyber security. please welcome the in -- join me in welcoming steven bucci. [applause] >> we have a very timely subjects to discuss, and i think we have a great panel of experts that will be doing be discussing to get us started. i have been interested in this because one of the first things i did was testified before congress about the weapons of mass destruction threat that syria and the somewhat untimely demise mig
and the reason is this. after the u.s.-led invasion of iraq which syria opposed, and syria was turning a blind eye to cross into iraq to kill u.s. soldiers and allied soldiers. there was a reason why they did that. they wanted the bush doctrine to fail and they thought they were next on the hit list so they would do anything they could to help make this happen. one high-level syrian official told me later on, he said of course they were helping iraq. we wanted our guys to kill them. that is why we went into iraq. we wanted to get them out and get them through and you guys would kill them. and when he survived, particularly after the assassination of former lebanese prime minister in february 2005 that was blamed on syria by most of the international community and the pressure just escalated exponentially after that against syria. people in late 2005 for counting the days when the assad regime, there were syrian expatriates and organizations that were just waiting to move in. but he survived that and i think that really created in him a sense of triumphalist and survivalism that very much infor
and general jim jones. >> i quite agree that my judgment is that much of the world wants u.s. leadership, they don't feel comfortable without it, but they no longer react to any dictatorial or any due toarls from us. they want to participate but they also want to be listened to. >> i am not even sure where the word leader hip is a good word to describe the role america should play in the world. we should be playing the stabilizing role. we should be organizing our coalitions, we should be a source of stability, but when we talk about leadership, too many people think of the iraq and 2003, which was a fatally bad exercise of leadership. >> rose: we conclude this evening with dexter filkins of the new yorker magazine who has a remarkable story about death in iraq and reunion in the united states. >> the i interviewed a guy in the peace, a psychiatrist who used the term moral injury and he said a lot of soldiers and marines stuff from moral injury, which he described as sort of it happens when you get an order, you do something that you believe at the time was absolutely correct and the onl
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,154 (some duplicates have been removed)